Boy Named Banjo - NO COVER

with Tenth Mountain Division

BNB_breakout_410px.jpg

Mon, Mar 23

Boy Named Banjo - NO COVER

with Tenth Mountain Division

Doors: 7:30 pm
Start: 8:00 pm
Age: All ages
Price:$0 (Under 21 $5 Surcharge) GA
NO COVER

Event Information

Genre: Country


ALL AGES: 18+ w/ valid photo ID, under 18 must be accompanied by parent or guardian.


$5 surcharge under 21

Boy Named Banjo

Long before Boy Named Banjo, two of the founding members of the genre-bending band grew up a mile down the road from each other in Nashville. William Reames and Willard Logan both picked up the guitar at an early age, took lessons from the same teacher in town, and even played in the same middle school band together.

A shared love for bluegrass, folk, and singer/songwriter music sparked a different musical friendship for Reames between him and banjo player, Barton Davies. Before long, the two youngsters enthusiastically bounced songs off each other and discovered some of their favorite bands like The Steeldrivers, John Hartford, and The Infamous Stringdusters. In no time at all, they were writing and performing songs of their own, and at the age of 16, they decided to form their own band. Only, they needed a mandolin player. That's when they called Logan - and the two longtime friends, and now Davies, were bandmates once again.

"We were still too young to step foot inside a bar when we first started to play," Davies recalls, "so we'd set up shop on the sidewalk outside of Robert's Western World in downtown Nashville and play our own songs for whomever would listen." According to Davies - about halfway through one of their sets, a man came stumbling out of Robert's, got in Barton's face and yelled "play that thing, Banjo Boy! C'mon, Banjo!" Reames texted Davies later that night - "Boy Named Banjo."

With a brand new name and a bunch of original songs, the trio recorded The Tanglewood Sessions, an honest, emotional, roots-driven look into the lives of the young outfit. Unexpectedly, the album was received quite well and now has over 3 million streams on Spotify.

In 2013, BNB invited drummer Sam McCullough to join the group, before recording its sophomore album, Long Story Short (2014). The band got its first breakthrough by earning a spot on the 2015 Bonnaroo lineup, which led to some hometown love for the native Nashvillians. Shortly after releasing Lost on Main EP in 2015, Boy Named Banjo found its missing piece - Ford Garrard (bass), hit the road, and hasn't stopped touring since.

Boy Named Banjo's sound has grown up alongside them into an energetic blend of country, alt-rock, and folk-pop that will keep listeners smiling, clapping, and dancing along. Catch a live show and find out for yourself.

Tenth Mountain Division

Born in the fertile breeding grounds of the mountains of Colorado, Tenth Mountain Division is continuing the musical legacy set down by their forefathers in Colorado. Like those that came before, Tenth Mountain Division is pushing the sound found in the mountains into bold, new directions with their exploratory take on Americana that dips freely in the well of all their diverse influences, classic Southern Rock, the progressive bluegrass that was born in their backyard in Colorado, the adventurous spirit of sixties psychedelic blues, and straight ahead driving rock ‘n’ roll. Much like their Colorado predecessors, Leftover Salmon, The String Cheese Incident, and Yonder Mountain String Band, they defy simple categorization; instead they reference their musical history with their high-energy shows as they blaze new musical paths every night. As they do so they have become the new voice of the Colorado music scene, taking their Ski-party sound around the country and making every show feel like a night in the mountains.

Tenth Mountain Division was first born in 2010 when high-school classmates, Winston Heuga (mandolin) and MJ Ouimette (guitar) first met when they discovered a shared musical interest. The two young musicians started penning songs together that were inspired by the lore of the 10th Mountain Division military infantry and the natural beauty that surrounded their hometown in the Rocky Mountains. They ended up at the University Colorado Boulder where they briefly played as an acoustic trio with upright bassist, Connor Dunn before meeting drummer Tyler Gwynn and keyboardist Campbell Thomas. The addition of drums and keys to Heuga and Ouimette’s deep musical bond, widened their musical palette, taking the band in new directions and pointing to bold, uncharted, musical horizons. They released their first album, Cracks in the Sky, in 2016 and followed it up with a national tour that saw them packing shows across the country. The band’s lineup was solidified soon after with the addition of Andrew Cooney and immediate success followed. Since then they have become a regular presence on the festival circuit including stops at Summer Camp, Aiken Bluegrass Festival, Winter Wondergrass, Yarmony, ARISE, and Leftover Salmon’s Boogie at the Broadmoor. They released their second album, In Good Company, in 2018. It was an album that Live for Live Music declared was, “chock full of raw rock and roll, with a savory listening experience guaranteed for all.” The band is currently in the studio with Railroad Earth’s Tim Carbone working on their next album and continuing their non-stop touring. – Tim Newby: Author of ‘Bluegrass in Baltimore’ & ‘Leftover Salmon: Thirty Years of Festival’